Nutrition and Health from Raspberries

Raspberry picking is something that I used to do a lot of in the past, and really should start doing again.   I used to spend a lot of time in our woodlands picking blueberries, but this was before there were ever bear sitings in our area...now there are not just occasional sitings, but they have become regular visitors.  So I hesitate to wander in the woods alone.
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As for Raspberries, we have them on our property, and there is a rural road not far from us lined with a chain link fence, and up against the fence there are many many Raspberry bushes reaching through the fence to the sun, and at the right time of year, they would be full of berries.  I would come home with bags full.  

Raspberries are a delicious fruit, and according to the latest research, a very healthy fruit as well. Research published in the May 2005 issue of the journal Biofactors shows that Raspberries are loaded with powerful phytonutrients and antioxidants that can support your immune system and help your body to ward off disease.

The antioxidants in Raspberries include ellagic acid which protects your cells from becoming damaged. Other nutrients in Raspberries include quercetin, kaempferol, and the cyanidin-based molecules called cyanidin-3-glucosylrutinoside and cyanidin-3-rutinoside. These flavonoid molecules are also classified as anthocyanins, and they belong to the group of substances that give raspberries their rich red color.

The anthocyanins in Raspberries are very powerful antioxidants that have antimicrobial properties as well, including the ability to prevent overgrowth of certain bacteria and fungi in the body such as Candida. The biggest contribution to raspberries' antioxidant capacity is their ellagitannins, a family of compounds almost exclusive to the raspberry, which are reported to have anti-cancer activity.
In addition to their abundant phytonutrient and antioxidant content, raspberries are a rich source of manganese and vitamin C that help protect the body's tissue from oxygen-related damage. They are also a good source of important nutrients such as riboflavin, folate, niacin, magnesium, potassium, B vitamins and copper.

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Updated 5/6/13

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